Will the Hashemites Fall?

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What will happen to Jordan is, of course, a crucial question. The King, who is a pretty clever fellow, and not at all ossified (or mummified) in the manner of Hosni Mubarak, took the large preemptive step of firing his government. But the question is, is that enough? I asked Robert Satloff, the head of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and the country's leading Jordan expert, what he thinks is going to happen next. Here is his answer:

So far, events in Jordan point to an Arab domino that is not falling. Protests in Jordan appear to focus on economic issues, not the status of the monarchy or the need for democracy. In Jordan, rotating prime ministers is the time-honored method for the king to defuse popular tension and unless sparks begin to fly in troublesome areas -- Zarqa and Irbid (among Palestinians), Maan and Kerak (among Transjordanians) -- I expect the monarchy to weather this storm. Of course, as we have seen, situations can change rapidly but so far, the Hashemites are staying (perhaps uneasily) on the throne.
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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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