The Egyptian Uprising in Pictures

How did the country go from relative calm to outright revolt so fast?

Protests, riots, and opposition groups ranging from socialists to Islamists have challenged Hosni Mubarak throughout his 29-year rule, but Egypt's autocratic president always held on to power. It looked like things would stay that way until the day he died or handed office to his son. But, over the past two weeks, thousands of Egyptians have flooded the streets in a now week-long protest movement that has quickly brought the most serious threat Mubarak has ever faced. How did it all happen so fast?


Jared Keller contributed to this story.

Presented by

Justin Miller was an associate editor at The Atlantic from 2009 to 2011. He is now the homepage editor at New York magazine. More

Justin Miller was a associate editor at The Atlantic. Previously he was an assistant editor at RealClearPolitics, a political reporter in Ohio, and a freelance journalist.

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Global

Just In