The Egyptian Uprising in Pictures

How did the country go from relative calm to outright revolt so fast?

Protests, riots, and opposition groups ranging from socialists to Islamists have challenged Hosni Mubarak throughout his 29-year rule, but Egypt's autocratic president always held on to power. It looked like things would stay that way until the day he died or handed office to his son. But, over the past two weeks, thousands of Egyptians have flooded the streets in a now week-long protest movement that has quickly brought the most serious threat Mubarak has ever faced. How did it all happen so fast?


Jared Keller contributed to this story.

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Justin Miller was an associate editor at The Atlantic from 2009 to 2011. He is now the homepage editor at New York magazine. More

Justin Miller was a associate editor at The Atlantic. Previously he was an assistant editor at RealClearPolitics, a political reporter in Ohio, and a freelance journalist.

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