Orbital View: Massive Cyclone Bears Down on Australia

Via NASA's Terra satellite:


ayasi_tmo_2011032.jpg

On February 1, Cyclone Yasi continued toward Queensland, Australia, where it is expected to make landfall on February 2. The Sydney Morning Herald reported that tens of thousands of residents were evacuating ahead of the storm's anticipated landfall. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image at 10 a.m. Queensland time on February 1. The massive storm extends over the Solomon Islands and grazes Papua New Guinea. Sporting a well-defined eye, Yasi had maximum sustained winds of 220 kilometers per hour and gusts up to 270 kilometers per hour.

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Jared Keller is a former associate editor for The Atlantic and The Atlantic Wire and has also written for Lapham's Quarterly's Deja Vu blog, National Journal's The Hotline, Boston's Weekly Dig, and Preservation magazine. 

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