Orbital View: Tidal Flats and Channels in the Bahamas

Via NASA's Expedition 26 crew:


tidal flats.jpg

While in orbit aboard the International Space Station, an astronaut from NASA's Expedition 26 crew snapped this clear shot of the tidal flats and channels near Sandy Cay, on the western side of Long Island and along the eastern margin of the Great Bahama Bank. Composed mainly of carbonate sediments ringed by reefs, the sediments were formed mostly from the skeletal remains of organisms settling to the sea floor; over geologic time, these sediments consolidated to form carbonate sedimentary rocks such as limestone. 

The continuously exposed parts of the island are brown, a result of soil formation and vegetation growth. Light blue-green regions indicate shallow water on the tidal flat, while the channels and areas to the south of the island have a vivid blue color that indicates deeper water.
Presented by

Jared Keller is a journalist based in New York. He has written for Bloomberg Businessweek, Pacific Standard, and Al Jazeera America, and is a former associate editor for The Atlantic.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

Video

Is Minneapolis the Best City in America?

No other place mixes affordability, opportunity, and wealth so well.

More in Global

Just In