Has a Military Coup Already Happened in Egypt?

More

My Egyptian correspondent sends more thoughts:

 
Here is an update from me based on my reading of the situation: 
There is something mysterious going on in Egypt and Washington right now. Mubarak has not been heard of since the start of the events on Tuesday . . . the first announcement of the curfew was put out under the auspices of the "military governor" of Egypt, which is a title no one had used before, and I hadn't heard before . . . after about an hour, the curfew announcement was changed to be under "the President of Egypt in his capacity as military governor." This is strange.

The top military person in Egypt was here, in Washington, and just returned on his way back to Cairo. In the press conference that just ended, I can conclude from the way the questions were answered that the US has stopped its support of Mubarak and is calling on him to stop resisting the protesters and meet their demands.

There was a question whether the US still supports Mubarak and the answer was "we are following the very fluid situation," There was an opportunity to affirm the support but it was not taken. So the conclusion must be that the US No Longer Supports Mubarak.

The other interesting thing that came out of the press conference was that the Pentagon has been in touch with the Egyptian military. And another thing is that we haven't heard that President Obama spoke with Mubarak.

So it is possible that the US is discussing with some in Egypt the post-Mubarak era. This explains why Mubarak has not been heard of, and why a top Military person was in Washington talking to the Pentagon. It's possible that the military already has done something inside Egypt but not announced it yet.

It is very interesting indeed.
Update: And just as I post, it looks like his initial analysis was correct.  Mubarak is telling the government to resign, but staying in power himself.
Jump to comments
Presented by

Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

The Remote Warehouse Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where the Wild Things Go

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Adults Need Playtime Too

When was the last time you played your favorite childhood game?

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Global

Just In