Cablegate Chronicles: Yemen's Unprotected Nuclear Bomb-Making Materials

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Radioactive materials sit unguarded at a facility in Yemen.

FROM: SANAA, YEMEN
TO: STATE DEPARTMENT
DATE: JANUARY 9, 2010
CLASSIFICATION: SECRET
SEE FULL CABLE

¶1. (S) The lone security guard standing watch at Yemen's main radioactive materials storage facility was removed from his post on December 30, 2009, according toXXXXXXXXXXXX. XXXXXXXXXXXX. The only closed-circuit television security camera monitoring the facility broke six months ago and was never fixed, according to XXXXXXXXXXXX. The facility XXXXXXXXXXXX holds various radioactive materials, small amounts of which are used by local universities for agricultural research, by a Sana'a hospital, and by international oilfield services companies for well-logging equipment spread out across the country. "Very little now stands between the bad guys and Yemen's nuclear material," a worried XXXXXXXXXXXX told EconOff.

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