Cablegate Chronicles: China's Biometric Gait Machine

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A Chinese research institute's unusual biometric device identifies humans by the way they walk.

FROM: BEIJING, CHINA
TO: STATE DEPARTMENT
DATE: FEBRUARY 2, 2010
CLASSIFICATION: CONFIDENTIAL
SEE FULL CABLE

Institute of Intelligent Machines - Biometrics Research ------------------------------------

¶3. (C) The Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) Institute of Intelligent Machines (IIM) in Hefei has developed a biometrics device that uses a person's pace to identify them. The device measure weight and two-dimensional sheer forces applied by a person's foot during walking to create a uniquely identifiable biometrics profile. The device can be covertly installed in a floor and is able to collect biometrics data on individuals covertly without their knowledge. When questioned about the device's potential applications, IIM officials stated the device was being used by "secret" customers and was not available on the commercial market. IIM also said they were involved with China's "Program 863." (COMMENT: Program 863 is China's national high-technology development plan that includes both military and civilian technology development programs; therefore, it is likely the People's Liberation Army (PLA) is one of the customers for whom this biometrics device was developed. END COMMENT)


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