Orbital View: Toxic Sludge in Hungary

Via NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite:

toxic sludge NASA post1.jpg

On October 4, toxic red sludge began leaking out of western Hungary's Ajkai Timfoldgyar's alumina plant. The sludge, a byproduct of alumina production, flooded several local towns,  killed four people, and forced hundreds to evacuate. According to the World Wide Fund for Nature, if the heavy metals in the sludge are absorbed by ground vegetation, they could continue to have negative environmental effects for decades.

NASA's Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA's Earth Observing-1 satellite shows the sludge flowing west from the alumina plant, which includes the bright blue and brick red reservoir shown on the image.   

Presented by

Elizabeth Weingarten is an editorial assistant at the New America Foundation. A former Slate editorial assistant, she also previously wrote for and produced the Atlantic's International Channel.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Global

Just In