Formerly Anti-Fascist NYRB Tries to Shmeiss Paul Berman

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Sol Stern takes on Malise Ruthven, who took on Paul Berman in the pages of the New York Review of Books, an animating purpose of which seems to be to discredit the idea that Israel, or the Jews as a whole, might just have the slightest traces of truth and/or justice on their side. Ruthven is particularly interested in disproving the now-proven notion that the founders of modern Islamism were disproportionately influenced by European fascism:

Ruthven cannot allow himself to deal forthrightly with this issue of Islamic fascism, a central theme of Berman's book. He insists defensively on Hassan al-Banna's "stated belief that Nazi racial theories were incompatible with Islam." Why, then, did al-Banna arrange--as Herf and other historians have documented--for the translation and distribution to the Arab world of Mein Kampf? Even Ruthven once admitted--in The New York Review--that Nazi doctrines about the Jews had infected Muslim Brotherhood offshoots like Hamas. "Imported European anti-Semitism is now embedded in the charter of Hamas, whose thirty-second article explicitly cites the Protocols as 'proof' of Israeli conduct," Ruthven wrote in 2008. "As Sari Nusseibeh, the Palestinian philosopher and former PLO representative in Jerusalem, has observed, Hamas's charter 'sounds as if it were copied out from the pages of Der Stürmer.'" 
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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. Author of the book Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror, Goldberg also writes the magazine's advice column. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. Previously, he served as a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward, and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

His book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. Goldberg rthe recipient of the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism. He is also the recipient of 2005's Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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