Al-Qaeda's Magazine: The Second Issue

In June, The Atlantic's Marc Ambinder broke the story about al-Qaeda's new magazine, Inspire. Among the many features in the first issue of the magazine: "How to make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom." The latest edition of Inspire contains similarly chilling content. One article, "The Ultimate Mowing Machine," offers an alternative use for a pickup truck. It can be used not to mow grass, but to "mow down the enemies of Allah." CNN spoke to one expert for insight into some of the more important elements of the current issue:

Adam Raisman, senior analyst at SITE Intelligence Group, said the "very well-presented magazine" covers a variety of topics, is meant to reach a wider audience, and tries to be tongue-in-cheek in its presentation.

"The magazine has suggestions, ideology it attempts to instill in the reader, and it includes tips for technology," Raisman said.

But there's an ambiguity in CNN's take on Raisman's interpretation: Has the magazine's presentation changed since the first issue? Or, is it meant to reach a wider audience than before? Is the tongue-in-cheek approach new, too?

Either way, it's difficult to see that approach in most of the article examples.

There are writings in the magazine by Yemeni-American cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, who U.S. authorities have linked to the failed attempt to blow up a U.S.-bound jetliner in December. Samir Khan wrote an article entitled, "I Am Proud to be a Traitor to America."

There is recycled material. The latest issue includes recent commentary from Adam Yahiye Gadahn, who is an American, about President Barack Obama.

Read the full story at CNN.


 

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Elizabeth Weingarten is an editorial assistant at the New America Foundation. A former Slate editorial assistant, she also previously wrote for and produced the Atlantic's International Channel.

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