Goldblog Assignment Desk, J Street Edition (UPDATED)

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Goldblog can't travel to Hong Kong right now to find Consolacion Esdicul, the mystery woman who has provided seven percent of J Street's operating budget since the group was founded. But he would invite intrepid Hong Kong-based journalists to find Esdicul and ask her several questions, including:
1) Where did she get $811,697 to donate to J Street?
2) Why did she donate precisely $811,697?
3) Why did she donate at all?
4) Does she define herself as a progressive Zionist?
5) Does she believe that the Obama Administration's approach to peace-making has paid dividends yet?
6) Is she involved, as her "business associate" Bill Benter is, in sports betting?
7) What other organizations does she support?

This is a good story for someone. It sure as hell deserves exposure: Imagine if we discovered that AIPAC received seven percent of its funding from a Hong Kong-based woman possibly associated in some manner with a gambling concern? That would be a blowout story. So is this one.

Update: Yes, I'm aware that Sheldon Adelson, the almost-ridiculously right-wing Israel supporter who was once a donor to Aipac, owns casinos. But Adelson is American. The question for me on this Esdicul issue is this: Why is J Street taking money from foreign donors? Aipac, according to its spokesman, Josh Block, only takes money from American citizens. If anyone can contradict this assertion, please let me know. Another question: Was Ediscul a pass-through? And if so, why?

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. Author of the book Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror, Goldberg also writes the magazine's advice column. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. Previously, he served as a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward, and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

His book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. Goldberg rthe recipient of the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism. He is also the recipient of 2005's Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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