'Islamic Facebook': Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood Gets Into Social Media

Members of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's banned Islamist opposition movement, have created their own social networking site. It's called Ikhwanbook (Ikhwan means "brotherhood" in Arabic). Since the Brotherhood is banned, members can't disseminate information through traditional media outlets. For now, the site is functioning on a trial basis, but the Brotherhood has plans for a full launch as soon as they attract more members.

A senior member of the banned Islamist group says the aim is to spread awareness of moderate Islamic values.

The Brotherhood's version - Ikhwanbook - looks similar to Facebook, but users say it respects Islamic values better.

It has more reserved use of photographs, less intrusion in the personal lives of members, and a different attitude to homosexuality.

The launch of the website is part of a wider attempt to increase the Islamic group's presence on the internet.

Read the full story at BBC News.

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Elizabeth Weingarten is an editorial assistant at the New America Foundation. A former Slate editorial assistant, she also previously wrote for and produced the Atlantic's International Channel.

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