A Policy Statement

From James Fallows:

Policy statement: Usually I don't quote people by name unless you say in an incoming message, "you can use my name." This saves me sending follow-up emails, and it is safer all around than the opposite default presumption. But the opposite rule does apply in this case. If you write with a direct complaint about Jeffrey Goldberg or this article, I will assume that I can use your name if I later quote any more messages. That seems only fair.

I'd like to add my own policy statement. If you are writing to me with a direct complaint about James Fallows, please don't, please just send it to Ta-Nehisi, who will be receiving complaints about Fallows through this Thursday at noon. Megan will be receiving complaints about Ta-Nehisi and Ambinder through tomorrow. Starting on Wednesday, Ambinder will be receiving complaints about Clive Crook and Andrew and any other Englishmen we find lurking on this site. Josh Green will be accepting complaints about Hillary Clinton all week. Megan will be receiving complaints about Barack Obama until 2012, or perhaps 2016. And I will be receiving complaints, against my will, about the actions of various perfidious Jews until I figure out a way to disable my mailbox.

Presented by

Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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