Orbital View: Sea Surface Temps at the Outset of Hurricane Season

Via Japan's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E), on NASA's Aqua satellite:

Sea Surface Temperatures at the Start of 2010 Hurricane Season

At the start of what's forecast to be an "active to extremely active" hurricane season, scientists have photographed a band of water thousands of miles long that is warm enough -- above 82 degrees Fahrenheit -- to promote hurricane formation. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued the forecast in late May and placed a 70 percent chance on there being 14 to 23 named storms, 8 to 14 hurricanes, and 3 to 7 major hurricanes. The 2010 hurricane season began on June 1 and lasts until the end of the year.

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Niraj Chokshi is a former staff editor at TheAtlantic.com, where he wrote about technology. He is currently freelancing and can be reached through his personal website, NirajC.com. More

Niraj previously reported on the business of the nation's largest law firms for The Recorder, a San Francisco legal newspaper. He has also been published in The Hartford Courant, The Seattle Times and The Age, in Melbourne, Australia. He's also a longtime programmer and sometimes website designer.

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