Europe's Crisis Is Political

The remarkable thing about the European Union is how far this project has come without its partners ever deciding what it was for -- or, more precisely, where it would stop. The crisis now facing the EU demands answers to those questions. But this is not the first time that circumstances have demanded such answers. The European way is not to provide them, which would be hard, but to keep on muddling through.

It has always worked before. As I say, the Union has come this far, and it has been a stunning achievement. Governments will doubtless try the same approach once more. This time, though, I wonder if they will finally hit the wall.

For reasons I explain in this column for National Journal, I think they will.

Presented by

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Global

Just In