On That United Nations Report

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A number of loyal Goldblog readers have asked me why I haven't commented on the U.N. report that found Israel guilty of various war crimes. The reason is simple: The U.N. is hopelessly biased against Israel; the mandate of Goldstone, the chief of the hanging party, was to find Israel guilty (yes, he's Jewish, but so what? There are all kinds of Jews, including this guy); the report does not differentiate between offensive action and defensive action, and so on. Why this report, from an organization that has Saudi Arabia and Cuba on its Human Rights Council, should be taken seriously is beyond me. I'd much sooner read Human Rights Watch reports on Israel, even the ones written by a Nazi-memorabilia-collecting-fetishist.

Do I have to say that I don't support everything Israel did in Gaza? Yes, I suppose so. I don't support everything Israel did in Gaza (starting with pulling out of Gaza, but that's another story). Shooting isn't always the smartest response to provocation, and shooting wildly certainly isn't, as I wrote here. What I object to is scapegoating. It's been with us for a while as a phenomenon, and we hoped that after the Holocaust, it would subside, but it's apparently an undying disease.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. Author of the book Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror, Goldberg also writes the magazine's advice column. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. Previously, he served as a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward, and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

His book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. Goldberg rthe recipient of the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism. He is also the recipient of 2005's Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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