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The Crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214

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Last Saturday, July 6, Asiana Airlines flight 214 from Incheon, South Korea to San Francisco, crashed during a landing attempt at San Francisco International Airport. The flight was carrying 307 people, and most were able to evacuate safely, 182 were injured, and two Chinese students aboard were killed. The National Transportation Safety Board is at work, trying to determine the exact cause, but what is known so far shows that the aircraft was low and underspeed during its approach, and the tail section appears to have clipped the seawall at the end of the runway, as the Boeing 777 struck the tarmac hard. This collection of images contains many photographs from passenger Eugene Anthony Rah, who was documenting the scene as he fled the aircraft. [34 photos]

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Kim Yoon-ju, a flight attendant who was working aboard Asiana Airlines flight 214 when it crash-landed at San Francisco airport, cries as she is greeted by Park Sam-koo, Chairman of the Kumho-Asiana group, upon her arrival at Incheon Airport in Incheon, South Korea, on July 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Kim Hong-Ji)
Kim Yoon-ju, a flight attendant who was working aboard Asiana Airlines flight 214 when it crash-landed at San Francisco airport, cries as she is greeted by Park Sam-koo, Chairman of the Kumho-Asiana group, upon her arrival at Incheon Airport in Incheon, South Korea, on July 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Kim Hong-Ji)
In this photo taken by Asiana Airlines flight 214 passenger Eugene Anthony Rah, passengers walk away from the Boeing 777 aircraft after a crash-landing at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. Some can be seen carrying luggage and other carry-on items, spurring widespread criticism. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
Passengers evacuate the Asiana Airlines Boeing 777, after a crash landing at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
Passengers move away from the crash site of Astana flight 214, at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
Fire crews work to extinguish flames as passengers evacuate an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 aircraft after a crash-landing at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
Asiana Airlines flight attendants and rescued passengers rest on the runway after flight 214 crash-landed, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 is engulfed in smoke on the tarmac after a crash-landing in San Francisco, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
This photo provided by Zach Custer shows smoke rising from the Asiana Airlines crash at San Francisco Airport, on July 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Zach Custer) #
First responders tend to Asiana Airlines flight attendants and rescued passengers as they gather near the runway after the crash of flight 214, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 is engulfed on the tarmac, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
Firefighters spray water on Asiana Airlines flight 214 as it sits on the runway burning at San Francisco International Airport in this July 6, 2013 photo. (Reuters/Air Station San Francisco/USCG Southwest) #
In this photo by passenger Eugene Anthony Rah, smoke rises from the wreckage iof Asiana flight 214, at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Eugene Anthony Rah) #
This photo provided by Dawn Siadatan shows Asiana Airlines flight 214 just moments after crashing at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Dawn Siadatan) #
Wreckage from a Boeing 777 airplane lies on the tarmac at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (Kimberly White/Getty Images) #
Seen from the rear, tail section missing, the wreckage of Asiana Airlines Flight 214, at San Francisco International Airport, on July 7, 2013. (Reuters/NTSB) #
The detached tail and landing gear of Asiana Flight 214 rest on the tarmac, on July 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Noah Berger) #
Authorities stand at the seawall along the start of a runway where an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 plane crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Jed Jacobsohn) #
An NTSB agent photographs part of the tail section of the Boeing 777 Asiana Airlines Flight 214 aircraft, on July 7, 2013. (AP Photo/NTSB) #
An aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane, as another plane approaches, on July 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) #
At lower left, the wreckage of flight 214 lies burned on a runway at San Francisco International Airport, the city of San Francisco visible in the distance, on July 6, 2013. (Ezra Shaw/Getty Images) #
The burned-out shell of Asiana flight 214, on July 6, 2013. (Ezra Shaw/Getty Images) #
Investigators pass the detached tail and landing gear of Asiana flight 214, on July 6, 2013, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Noah Berger) #
NTSB Aerospace Engineer Greg Smith receives flight recorders from Asiana Airlines flight 214 in the NTSB laboratory in Washington, on July 7, 2013. Investigators took the flight data recorder, left foreground, and the cockpit voice recorder, behind it, from the Boeing 777-200 to NTSB headquarters overnight to begin examining its contents for clues to the last moments of the flight, officials said. (AP Photo/NTSB) #
Asiana Airlines President and CEO Yoon Young-doo, fourth from right, and board members bow during a press conference after a crash landing of an Asiana Airlines flight at San Francisco airport, at its head office in Seoul, South Korea, on July 7, 2013. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man) #
People look from a path along San Francisco Bay after an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Robert Galbraith) #
Wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane, in San Francisco, on July 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) #
National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman (front) and Investigator-in-Charge Bill English look at interior damage to Asiana Airlines Flight 214, in this July 6, 2013 photo. (Reuters/NTSB) #
The interior of the Boeing 777 Asiana Airlines flight 214 aircraft, seen on July 7, 2013. (AP Photo/NTSB) #
An aerial view of the burned fuselage of the Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 that crashed at San Francisco International Airport, on July 6, 2013. (Reuters/Jed Jacobsohn) #
A passenger of Asiana flight 214, who declined being identified, leaves San Francisco General Hospital after being treated for injuries suffered during the crash, on July 7, 2013. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) #
An unidentified family member of one of two Chinese students killed in the crash of Asiana Airlines flight 214, cries at the airline's counter as she and other family members check in for a flight to San Francisco, at Pudong International Airport in Shanghai, China, on July 8, 2013. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) #
Asiana Airlines President and CEO Yoon Young-doo, left, greets unidentified family members of two Chinese students killed in an Asiana Airlines plane crash on Saturday at San Francisco International Airport, at the transit lounge of the Incheon International Airport in Incheon, South Korea, on July 8, 2013. (AP Photo/Korea Pool via Yonhap) #
Students of the Jiangshan Middle School light candles to form a heart shape and initials (below), of the victims Yang Mengyuan and Wang Linjia of the Asiana Airlines crash, in Quzhou, Zhejiang province, on July 8, 2013. (Reuters/Stringer) #
Kim Yoon-ju, a flight attendant aboard Asiana Airlines flight 214 when it crash-landed at San Francisco airport, arrives at the Incheon Airport in South Korea, on July 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Kim Hong-Ji) #

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