Featured Archives



July 1982

Living With a Computer
by James Fallows

The process works this way.

When I sit down to write a letter or start the first draft of an article, I simply type on the keyboard and the words appear on the screen. For six months, I found it awkward to compose first drafts on the computer. Now I can hardly do it any other way. It is faster to type this way than with a normal typewriter, because you don’t need to stop at the end of the line for a carriage return (the computer automatically “wraps” the words onto the next line when you reach the right-hand margin), and you never come to the end of the page, because the material on the screen keeps sliding up to make room for each new line. It is also more satisfying to the soul, because each maimed and misconceived passage can be made to vanish instantly, by the word or by the paragraph, leaving a pristine green field on which to make the next attempt …

None of this may sound impressive to those who have fleets of secretaries at their disposal, or to writers who can say precisely what they mean the first time through. Isaac Asimov recently complained in Popular Computing that his word-processor didn’t save him much time on revisions, since he composes at ninety words per minute and “95 per cent of what I write in the first draft stays in the second [and final] draft.” My first-draft survival ratio is closer to one percent, so for me the age of painless revisions is a marvel.

You won’t catch me saying that my machine has made me a better writer, but I don’t think it has made me any worse.

Volume 250, No. 1, pp. 84–91

Read the full article here.