How to Scramble an Egg Without Breaking Its Shell

The "Golden Goose" offers a unique way to enjoy your ovum.
Kickstarter

Are you someone who enjoys swimming in a pool that's on a cruise ship that's gliding through the ocean? What about walking on those moving airport walkways?

If so, I'd like to introduce you to a little-known breakfast item called a "golden egg"—an egg that has been scrambled before being cracked. Underneath its shell is a pale yellow blob consisting of the yolk and the white mixed together.

These are apparently an occasional delicacy in Japan. But now Americans, too, can enjoy this tawny delight.

A fully funded (!!) Kickstarter gadget known as the Golden Goose allows you to put a regular ole egg in the middle of a plastic cradle, and then spin it around using nylon cords attached to two plastic handles:

After whirring it viciously, just uncradle it, boil it, and voila! You have an unusual treat to contribute to singles' brunch.

Creator Geraint Krumpe told NPR, "that a hard-boiled golden egg comes out tasting like savory custard. And if you simply scramble the egg in its shell and crack it into an iron skillet, it creates a tasty scrambled egg dish because you never whisked in any outside air. Plus, there's a little less dish washing."

The Kickstarter is all sold out. But not to worry, Instructables tells us you can achieve the same thing with a pair of stockings. And here's someone doing it with a long-sleeved t-shirt:

I would suggest you serve your golden egg alongside baked stuffed potatoes and a tall glass of watermelon juice you made by drilling a coat-hanger into a watermelon.

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Olga Khazan is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where she covers health.

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