Werner Herzog's Paralyzing Case Against Texting While Driving

"He looked like he was asleep, until we rolled him over."
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SHARK300200.jpgHerzog (AP)

Bavarian polymath Werner Herzog's just-released film, From One Second to the Next (below), is 35 minutes of excruciating testimonials by people on the spectrum from affected to devastated by texting and driving. It's part of a campaign by AT&T to raise awareness. Expect it to do that.

Herzog did address the motive of the project in the context of the creeping intrusion of marketing in creative media. He told the Associated Press, "This has nothing to do with consumerism or being part of advertising products. This whole campaign is, rather, dissuading you from excessive use of a product."

Herzog explains, "I'm not a participant of texting and driving — or texting at all — but I see there's something going on in civilization which is coming with great vehemence at us."

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James Hamblin, MD, is a senior editor at The AtlanticHe is the host of If Our Bodies Could Talk.

 
 
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