DIY Egg Freezing: It's the Perfect Time

Take advantage of the warm months.
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Since I write about health every day, I get a lot of questions about egg freezing. My answer is always an emphatic yes, do it. And yes, you can do it yourself. But you have to know what you're doing.

You can't just put your eggs into the freezer, because they will explode.

Especially in rural areas after molting season, egg freezing is a good idea. Extremes of weather and the length of the days affect fertility rates, so we often enjoy a surplus of eggs during warm summer months. If you don't want them to go to waste, freeze them. Trust me, when you wake up on a frigid winter morning and want eggs, or an old flame drops by unexpectedly, you'll be glad you have them.

There's also a method of egg preservation called waterglassing, where you can immerse your eggs in sodium silicate and keep them in a stone crock in your basement. Be careful not to ingest the sodium silicate, though.

Another option is to smother your eggs in large quantities of salt, or rub them with lard, boric acid, or a lime/water solution. The idea is that if you clog up the egg’s pores and make them airtight, you can slow the aging process. You can also melt some clear beeswax in a porcelain dish over a gentle fire, stirring in some olive oil, and then dip the eggs one by one such that the wax hermetically closes the pores.

From what I hear, though, those methods have inconsistent results.

For freezing, start by selecting your freshest eggs. Crack them into some Tupperware or ice cube trays. Some people say that mixing in some honey or salt will stabilize them after thawing. Be sure to label the container to you know it's your eggs, to avoid mix-ups. I know what you're thinking—how could I forget that this is the container with my eggs in it—but if you're like me, you will.

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How long can the eggs remain frozen?

Indefinitely I suppose, but they can lose quality and get freezer burn over time, just like anything else.

How well does egg freezing work?

Very well

What if I am over 38 years of age?

Totally fine

Is egg freezing safe?

Yes

What are the costs?

None, there are almost no costs.

How many eggs should I store to be certain that I achieve a pregnancy?

What?

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James Hamblin, MD, is a senior editor at The Atlantic.

 
 
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