Cronut Burger: Canada's Brazen Move in Great Pastry Wars of 2013

Your move, pancreas.
[IMAGE DESCRIPTION]
(CNWGroup/LeDolci)

Throughout the latter half of August, the Canadian National Exhibition will feature an experiment—from artisanal burger purveyor Epic Burgers and Waffles and Canadian pastry shop Le Dolci—that's being called by Toronto's CTV News the "Maple Bacon Jam Cronut Burger."

This comes after French chef Dominique Ansel debuted and trademarked the name Cronutin New York in May. His SoHo bakery continues to enjoy massive demand for the croissant/donut, with lines that sometimes stretch multiple city blocks and fascinate American cultural critics. Though the Cronut has since been spun off—in Australia and Europe, in South Korean Dunkin’ Donuts as “New York pie donuts,” among other places—do not put it past a French pastry chef to be proactive in protecting his domain. Ansel's legal team already put a forcible end to a Santa Monica bakery's "Kronut."

Like the language of pastry, the trademark is international. Continued creativity in the realm of food portmanteaus is encouraged. The Cronut is nothing if not a lesson in accountability.

Presented by

James Hamblin, MD, is a senior editor at The Atlantic. He writes the health column for the monthly magazine and hosts the video series If Our Bodies Could Talk.

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Health

Just In