Breaking: Double Stuf Oreos May Not Actually Be Doubly Stuf'ed; Only 1.86 Times Stuf'ed

Team of high school math students makes national news for measuring sandwich cookies
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New Mega Stuf Oreos (Ricardo Velasquez/flickr)

Remember earlier this year when we found out that Subway's foot-long sandwiches were not always a foot long? Then Subway said it was just a name and a metric that they "strive for." People were furious, never ate at Subway again, and they went out of business.

No actually we kept eating tons of Subway, even though they treat us poorly, because we don't know what else to do. But Nabisco does seem concerned that new data will shake the foundation of the good Oreo name. A spokesperson told ABC News, "I can confirm for you that our recipe for the Oreo Double Stuf Cookie has double the Stuf, or creme filling, when compared with our base, or original Oreo cookie."

SHARK300200.jpgThe actual calculations (Dan Anderson / ABC News)

Can she, though?

Apparently concerned that there was not enough stuf on the market, Nabisco recently introduced the Mega Stuf Oreo. The Mega Stufs are an incremental step beyond the Double Stufs, which were introduced in 1974. They boast triple the stuf.

Since everyone is talking about Mega Stuf oreos and how great they are, as an exercise in applied consumer mathematics, high-school teacher Dan Anderson of Queensbury, New York, had students do some measuring, calculating, and reflecting. What they found will shock and disturb you. The Double Stuf Oreos had 1.86 times the stuf of regular Oreos, and the Mega Oreos had 2.68 times the stuf.

"This class is for students struggling with math so I'm always looking for hands-on activities," Anderson said, not realizing that he would be bloodying those hands, tarnishing the reputation of an iconic American sandwich cookie.

Or, did he realize?

More as this story unfolds.

 

 

[via NPR, ABC News]

Presented by

James Hamblin, MD, is a senior editor at The Atlantic. He writes the health column for the monthly magazine and hosts the video series If Our Bodies Could Talk.

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