Study: Non-Religious People's Faith in Science Increases Under Stress

Pre-regatta rowers were more likely to agree with Carl Sagan that "in a demon-haunted world, science is a candle in the dark."
More
RTR30D3K570.jpg
Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

PROBLEM: There's plenty of anecdotal, and even some neurological evidence that a strong belief system helps religious people deal with adversity. Do members of the world's third most popular faith -- that is, "no faith" -- seek comparable, secular comfort in times of hardship?

METHODOLOGY: Researchers from the department of experimental psychology at Oxford University approached 100 male and female rowers either during crew practice or right before a big regatta. They asked them how stressed they were, how religious they considered themselves to be, and how much they agreed with statements like "The scientific method is the only reliable path to knowledge" and "In a demon-haunted world, science is a candle in the dark" (that second one is attributed to Carl Sagan).

RESULTS: The pre-regatta rowers, who were predictably more stressed than the ones who were just practicing, also expressed a greater belief in science. That is, they were more likely to agree that "science is the most valuable part of human culture" and "science provides us with a better understanding of the universe than does religion." None were particularly religious.

IMPLICATIONS: The authors put their results forward as empirical evidence that it's not so much what we believe in, so long as we have something to turn to. "When it comes to believing," they write, "even if it is a belief in the scientific method as opposed to divine revelation, the underlying mechanism may be similar." The next step, they write, is to see whether a strong belief in the power of science can actually help people deal with their stress the way religious faith has been shown to.


The full study, "Scientific faith: Belief in science increases in the face of stress and existential anxiety," is published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Lindsay Abrams is an assistant editor at Salon and a former writer and producer for The Atlantic's Health Channel.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Social Security: The Greatest Government Policy of All Time?

It's the most effective anti-poverty program in U.S. history. So why do some people hate it?


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Health

Just In