Are You Going to Eat That Chair? Yes, and My Pencil Is Cheese, and This Candle Is Chocolate

The delicious edible housewares that result from combining baking and electricity.

With the hedonistic holiday season suddenly in full swing we're suddenly plagued by virtual visions of sugar plums dancing across every screen. Why is everything related to food right now? When we spotted American designer Victor Vetterlein's playful edible task lamp -- aptly named Bite Me -- over on Dezeen, we got to wondering what other clever delectable designs exist in the world. Here are the very best of the modern, mouth-watering designs that we found.

Bite Me Desk Lamp by Victor Vetterlein

dezeen_Bite-Me-edible-desk-lamp-by-Victor-Vetterlein-2.jpeg BITEME.jpg BITEME3.jpeg dezeen

Available in four natural flavors -- orange, cherry, blueberry, and apple -- this colorful task lamp is made from a biodegradable plastic derived from vegetable glycerin and agar. As the designer explains, "when the lamp is no longer useful or desired, the lighting strip is removed and the lamp may be eaten or thrown into the garden as compost." All you have to do to enjoy the gummy goodness is soak it in purified water for about an hour. It will taste like a big, wet gummy bear.

Sugarchair by Pieter Brenner

FOODDESIGN_PRONOTABLE_Sugarchair.jpeg SUGAR2.jpgPieter Brenner

This lick-able lollipop of a chair is made entirely out of pure sugar. You're meant to lick away to create a form that suits your style. Might take a lot of licking ...

Panpaati edible chairs by Enoc Armengol

Panpaati-EatingDesignArtProject-by-Enoc-Armengol-yatzer_4.jpeg Panpaati-EatingDesignArtProject-by-Enoc-Armengol-yatzer_6.jpegEnoc Armengol/Yatzer

These beautiful chairs were created by Spanish artist and designer Enoc Armengol and are made entirely out of bread. Armengol explains: "The bread represents a direct connection with nature. Using food is the most simple way to represent forms and to create something physically, similar to what Leonardo da Vinci and Dalí did in the past to create their prototypes or what children usually use to easily generate volumes to express their ideas."

Edible electronics by Nitsan Debbi

EE1.jpg EE2.jpg EE3.jpgDebbie Nitsan

By combining baking with electricity, Israeli designer Debbi Nitsan has created fully-functioning clocks, radios, and flashlights without the standard plastic casings.

Edible pens by Dave Hakkens

flavours.jpeg penmouth.jpeg explain.jpegDave Hakkens

Dutch designer Dave Hakkens wanted to address the fact that 90 percent of the pens we use get thrown away. He then posited: why not dispose of that 90 percent in a sustainable way by eating it? Thinking of everything, the candy they're made out of isn't sticky and it won't melt in your hands. Even the ink is edible!

The Matitizia by Cecilia Felli

Matitizia_2.jpeg PENCIL2.jpg Cecilia Felli/Supermarket

Made out of a natural licorice root, chew away while you brainstorm.

Parmesan cheese pencils by Koll Rebbe

PENCIL.jpeg PENCIL3.jpegJeannie Jeannie

Sprinkle delicious, appetizing flakes of Parmesan cheese on your meal with a handy pencil set! As an added bonus, the packaging includes a small ruler printed on the side, to let you properly portion things out.

The Baked Table by Andere Monjo

Andere-Monjo-Baked-Table-Bread-Installation-2.jpeg Andere-Monjo-Baked-Table-Bread-Installation-3.jpeg Andere-Monjo-Baked-Table-Bread-Installation-6.jpeginhabitat

This edible dinnerware is made entirely from flour, water, and lots of tiny seeds that, as Spanish designer Andre Monjo states, provide a tasty texture to the mix. The set includes plates, bowls, cutlery, and textiles.

Food Nests by Diane Leclair Bisson with Vito Gionatan Lassandro

diane_bisson_edible01.jpeg NEST2.jpgdesignboom

Exploring sustainability through the medium of food, Canadian designer and researcher Diane Leclair Bisson has developed a collection of consumable receptacles with Italian food designer Vito Gionatan Lassandro as part of her taste no waste initiative. The 'nests' are made entirely out of tomatoes making for a tasty alternative to Tupperware.

Molten Lava Chocolate Candle by Stéphane Bureaux

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Make a decadent warm lava cake simply by lighting one chocolate candle.



This post also appears on Flavorpill, an Atlantic partner site.

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Claire Cottrell is a writer at Flavorpill.

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