Alzheimer's as an Artistic Abstraction

A textured stop-motion journey through the progression of the disease.

Art, with its capacity for expressing in abstract form experiences and emotions too complex or confusing to name explicitly, has proven itself a powerful medium for exploring mental health issues -- from artist Bobby Baker's diary drawings of borderline personality disorder to children's illustrations of what it's like to have autism. Now comes Undone, a beautiful and bittersweet stop-motion film by animator Hayley Morris, inspired by her grandfather, which captures with tender abstraction the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

A behind-the-scenes look at Morris's production setup and sketches:

undone1.jpgundone2-600.jpgundone3.jpgundone4.jpgHayley Morris/Vimeo

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This post also appears on Brain Pickings, an Atlantic partner site.

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Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings. She writes for Wired UK and GOOD, and is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow.

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