Study of the Day: Cancer Patients Opt for 'Hopeful Gambles' Over 'Safe Bets'

New research in Health Affairs suggests that people in health care should consider more than just the costs and benefits of different courses of treatment.

Study of the Day
Cleo/Shutterstock

PROBLEM: Health-care providers, insurers, and policymakers typically focus on the average gains in patients' survival when assessing the medical and economic value of various treatments. Do terminally ill cancer patients consider the costs, risks, and benefits of different therapies in the same way?

METHODOLOGY: Researchers led by USC professor Darius Lakdawalla surveyed 150 cancer patients who were undergoing treatment. They asked them to choose between a "safe bet" therapy that guarantees 13 months of survival and a "hopeful gamble" that offers a 50/50 chance of either adding 35 months or subtracting 10 months to the same 13-month survival average.

RESULTS: Nearly 80 percent of patients preferred the riskier treatments over the safer therapies. It seems most respondents valued being given a chance at a substantial survival gain, even if typical outcomes did not improve.

CONCLUSION: When deciding on their course of treatment, terminally ill patients appear to choose hope over security.

IMPLICATION: Lakdawalla says insurers should go beyond average outcomes when deciding on what therapies to cover while physicians should connect with patients more to understand what they truly value. "Some patients are willing to take significant risks with their own lives in pursuit of a major gain in survival; others want to play it safe," he says. "The health-care system should respect those differences."

SOURCE: The full study, "How Cancer Patients Value Hope and the Implications for Cost-Effectiveness Assessments of High-Cost Cancer Therapies," is published in the journal Health Affairs.

Presented by

Hans Villarica writes for and produces The Atlantic's Health channel. His work has appeared in TIME, People Asia, and Fast Company.

Saving the Bees

Honeybees contribute more than $15 billion to the U.S. economy. A short documentary considers how desperate beekeepers are trying to keep their hives alive.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Health

Just In