The Computer Monitor That Can Tell If You're Slouching

A sensor embedded in Phillips' new monitor helps you keep track of your posture, which is only a little creepy.

Philips

Improper ergonomics at your workstation can lead to a potential bevy of workplace related injuries, including back and neck pain, eyestrain, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Realizing that "work should be suited to people, and not the other way around", Philips has released an interesting new 24″ LCD monitor. Besides being an all-around nice display to have at your workstation, the new monitor has a built-in "ErgoSensor" to promote better ergonomics.

Philips-ErgoSensor-diagram.jpg

Located in the top bezel of the display where a standard webcam would usually be found, the ErgoSensor is able to track the user's position and distance from the monitor and provide feedback if the person is not in an ergonomically correct position, for example, if someone is sitting too close to the screen or their neck posture is incorrect. When such feedback occurs, the user can reposition him or herself, or can adjust the display using a number of adjustments in the monitor's "SmartErgoBase".

The ErgoSensor Monitor also has a built-in time-break reminder feature so you'll know when to rest your eyes to avoid eyestrain. And you'll be saving energy too, because the ErgoSensor also detects whether a user is in front of the screen, and will shut down the screen to conserve power when you're away.


This post also appears on medGadget, an Atlantic partner site.

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