Jessica Lloyd-Jones's Beautiful Anatomical Neon-Gas Sculptures

Created at the Urban Glass art center in New York, Lloyd-Jones's human organs hold inert gases that are influenced by electrical current.

Medgadget

A loyal reader of ours points us to the beautiful anatomical neon works of Jessica Lloyd-Jones that were created at the Urban Glass art center in Brooklyn, New York.

We really appreciate how the neon gas within the glass really does parallel the functionality of each organ.

From the artist:

brain-neon1.jpg

Blown glass human organs encapsulate inert gases displaying different colors under the influence of an electric current. The human anatomy is a complex, biological system in which energy plays a vital role. Brain Wave conveys neurological processing activity as a kinetic and sensory, physical phenomena through its display of moving electric plasma. Optic Nerve shows a similar effect, more akin to the blood vessels of the eye and with a front 'lens' magnifiying the movement and the intensity of light. Heart is a representation of the human heart illuminated by still red neon gas. Electric Lungs is a more technically intricate structure with xenon gas spreading through its passage ways, communicating our human unawareness of the trace gases we inhale in our breathable atmosphere.

This post also appears on medGadget, an Atlantic partner site.

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