What Happens When You Question the Supremacy of New York Bagels

"Everyone knows the best bagels come fresh  from their local bagel shop -- except the 'experts' at Consumer Reports magazine."

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Consumer Reports has gotten itself into some uncomfortably tepid water over a recent declaration. About bagels. Like ordering pizza and hailing a cab properly, picking the best bagel is the provenance of the sort of person who does not appreciate being told differently than what they believe, because that belief comes with some major pride. Also because, obviously, as any New Yorker knows, some bagels are better than others. And Consumer Reports chose the wrong bagels.

The May issue of the magazine asks: "Who makes the best bagels?" To answer this, they dispatched trained testers to try eight plain and four everything bagels from a variety of purveyors. Admittedly, that's already a small sample size. But it gets worse! Frozen Lender's bagels, the kind your mom used to nuke in the microwave on special days before you went to school in your small suburban town, came out with high marks! Dunkin' Donuts bagels were also given the thumbs up. And Costco bagels were considered "very good." Reviewers were even kind of OK with a gluten-free bagel. And then there's this: "Thomas' Bagel Thins are a decent option if you're watching your weight, though they taste more like rolls than bagels."

Even worse: Consumer Reports editors went so far as to question the supremacy of the New York Bagel: "There's nothing quite like a New York bagel -- or is there?"

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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