Study of the Day: The Very Real Power of Your Good Intentions

The perception of love and kindness makes physical experiences more pleasurable and less painful, according to new research.

GSPhotography/Shutterstock

PROBLEM: Good intentions have a bad reputation. They're often described as useless, and some even claim they pave the road to hell.

METHODOLOGY: To test the effect of kindness and benevolence on physical experiences, University of Maryland psychologist Kurt Gray conducted three experiments. In the first trial, which examined pain, the participants received identical electric shocks at the hand of a partner who supposedly did so accidentally, maliciously, or compassionately. In the next test, which looked at pleasure, subjects sat on the same electric massage pad that was either turned on by a computer or a caring partner. Then, in the final trial, participants tasted similar sweet treats that came with either a pleasant note ("I picked this just for you. Hope it makes you happy") or an apathetic message ("I just picked it randomly").

RESULTS: Subjects who felt cared for in each experiment felt less pain from the shocks and enjoyed their massage and food more than those who were treated poorly or indifferently.

CONCLUSION: Good intentions can soothe pain, increase pleasure, and improve taste.

IMPLICATION: "The way we read another persons intentions changes our physical experience of the world," said Gray in a statement. Those in relationships should let their loved ones know that they care for them when they interact, and doctors and nurses should brush up on their bedside manner to reduce pain.

SOURCE: The full study, "Perceived Benevolence Soothes Pain, Increases Pleasure, and Improves Taste," is published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Presented by

Hans Villarica writes for and produces The Atlantic's Health channel. His work has appeared in TIME, People Asia, and Fast Company.

Life as an Obama Impersonator

"When you think you're the president, you just act like you are above everybody else."

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

VIdeo

Life as an Obama Impersonator

"When you think you're the president, you just act like you are above everybody else."

Video

Things Not to Say to a Pregnant Woman

You don't have to tell her how big she is. You don't need to touch her belly.

Video

Maine's Underground Street Art

"Graffiti is the farthest thing from anarchy."

Video

The Joy of Running in a Beautiful Place

A love letter to California's Marin Headlands

Video

'I Didn't Even Know What I Was Going Through'

A 17-year-old describes his struggles with depression.

More in Health

Just In