New Must-Read Books on Farming

Atiny Diffley unexpected page-turner, 'Turn Here Sweet Corn,' David Hanson and Edwin Marty's 'Breaking Through Concrete: Building an Urban Farm Revival,' and more.

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Atina Diffley, Turn Here Sweet Corn: Organic Farming Works, University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

I blurbed this one, with much pleasure: "Turn Here Sweet Corn is an unexpected page-turner. Atina Diffley's compelling account of her life as a Minnesota organic farmer is deeply moving not only from a personal standpoint but also from the political. Diffley reveals the evident difficulties of small-scale organic farming but is inspirational about its value to people and the planet." The book comes with an insert of glorious photographs illustrating the history she recounts. The political? The Diffley's fought to keep an oil company from running a pipeline through their property -- and won.

David Hanson and Edwin Marty, Breaking Through Concrete: Building an Urban Farm Revival, University of California Press, 2012.

Wonderfully photographed visits to a dozen urban farms all over America from Seattle (P-Patch) to Brooklyn's own Annie Novak's Eagle Street. The authors asked hard questions and got honest answers. This is a great resource for anyone who wants to get started, and the beautiful farms and farmers are well worth a look.

Jennifer Cockrall-King, Food and the City: Urban Agriculture and the New Food Revolution, Prometheus Books, 2012.

Cockrall-King went international. She visited cities in the United States, England, France, Canada, and Cuba to see what urban farmers were doing to create alternative food systems. They are doing plenty. This looks like a great excuse for ecotourism, dropping by, seeing for yourself, and getting to work.

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This post originally appeared on Food Politics, an Atlantic partner site.

Presented by

Marion Nestle is a professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University. She is the author of Food Politics, Safe Food, What to Eat, and Pet Food Politics. More

Nestle also holds appointments as Professor of Sociology at NYU and Visiting Professor of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell. She is the author of three prize-winning books: Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (revised edition, 2007), Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety (2003), and What to Eat (2006). Her most recent book is Feed Your Pet Right: The Authoritative Guide to Feeding Your Dog and Cat. She writes the Food Matters column for The San Francisco Chronicle and blogs almost daily at Food Politics.

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