Coke and Pepsi Change Recipes to Avoid Printing Cancer Warnings

California's new law requiring companies to put a warning label on products containing a recognized carcinogen prompted the change.

A store display of Diet Coke packages Reuters

The two biggest soda companies in the U.S. say that it isn't the possible cancer link in their caramel coloring ingredient that's making them switch their recipes around -- it's the cancer warning they'd have to put on their packaging that actually changed their minds.

Regardless of their motives, this is a good thing, and not just for hypochondriacs and heavy soda drinkers. Despite officials at the American Beverage Association (ABA) and Coca-Cola telling reporters that there aren't any health risks associated with 4-methylimidazole, the ingredient responsible for Coke and Pepsi's brown coloring, it's on California's list of carcinogens.

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