An Interactive MRI App for the iPad

The first of what Elsevier promises will be a line of educational software titles for various mobile devices, NeuroApps: MRI Atlas of Human White Matter makes learning anatomy of the brain fun.

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Elsevier has released its NeuroApps: MRI Atlas of Human White Matter, an app for the Apple iPad based on the popular tome of the same name. The interactive app was designed to make learning the anatomy of the brain a bit more fun and intuitive, and to make medical literature more interactive and practical for the current century.

A representative of Elsevier tells us that this is one of the first apps in an upcoming slate of educational software titles for mobile devices, based on Elsevier Science & Technology Books, that the company plans to release in the next few years.

Details and features of the app:

Find, visualize major fiber tracts from three orientations and in both MRI and DTI, and learn to identify the major pathways through the brain and their proximity to key neuroanatomical structures.

Scroll through the brain in sequence to follow a tract from beginning to end. View one, two, or all three orientations at the same time between coronal, axial, and sagittal sections.

  • Format allows viewer to compare coronal, horizontal, and sagittal sections in one view.
  • Two types of stereotaxic coordinates (Talairach and MNI coordinates) are provided to define brain locations.
  • Includes both MRI and DTI images and allows the user to switch between MRI and DTI view for any location in the brain
  • Fifty-three white matter structures, 38 cortical areas, and 22 deep gray matter structures are defined and labeled. In addition, locations of 11 white matter tracts and 36 cytoarchitectonic areas are defined. These structures can be interactively superimposed on the MRI/DTI images.
  • The trajectories of the tracts can be followed sequentially through the brain


This post also appears on medGadget, an Atlantic partner site.

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