Vital Signs: The First Quadruple Limb Transplant; Shortest Person

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The latest facts and figures from the all of the most influential medical journals; newspapers; and health, fitness, and wellness websites.

  • 22 -- The height, in inches, of Chandra Bahadur Dangi, a 72-year-old from western Nepal who claims to be the shortest living man in the world. Guinness World Records currently recognizes 23.5-inch-tall Junrey Balawing, 18, of the Philippines. Source: "Chandra Bahadur Dangi, 72, Say's He's the World's Shortest Man," CBS.
  • 1,670,000,000 -- The amount, in dollars, of damaged awarded by a jury to Johnson & Johnson that was overturned. The U.S. Supreme Court won't hear the patent-infringement suit concerning a rheumatoid-arthritis therapy. Source: "A.M. Vitals: Chavez to Have Third Operation," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 121 -- The number of disease outbreaks caused by dairy in the United States between 1993 and 2006, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Those outbreaks led to more than 4,400 illnesses, 239 hospitalizations, and three deaths. Source: "CDC: Raw Milk to Blame for Most Dairy-Related Disease Outbreaks," CBS.
  • 60 -- The percentage of those dairy-related outbreaks that were caused by raw milk products, which also includes cheese and yogurt. Source: "CDC: Raw Milk to Blame for Most Dairy-Related Disease Outbreaks," CBS.
  • 63 -- The percent increase in chance that teenagers who watch movies with drinking scenes will binge drink themselves, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal Open. Source: "Teens Who Watch Movies With Booze Scenes Twice as Likely to Drink," CBS.
  • 38,000,000 -- The number of adults in the United States who binge drink, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Source: "Teens Who Watch Movies With Booze Scenes Twice as Likely to Drink," CBS.
  • 9 -- The number of drinks that college-age Americans consume, on average, when binge drinking. Source: "Teens Who Watch Movies With Booze Scenes Twice as Likely to Drink," CBS.
  • 54 -- The number of health risks that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), including car crashes, sexually transmitted diseases, and liver disease, associates with binge drinking. Source: "Teens Who Watch Movies With Booze Scenes Twice as Likely to Drink," CBS.
  • 53 -- The percent that risk of death by colon cancer decreases when screening colonoscopies are used to detect and remove growths, according to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Source: "A.M. Vitals: Study Suggests Colonoscopy Cuts Cancer Deaths," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 65 -- The age at which Americans should be immunized against the whooping cough with the Tdap vaccine, if they haven't already done so, according to an advisory panel to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Source: "A.M. Vitals: Study Suggests Colonoscopy Cuts Cancer Deaths," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 586 -- The number of people infected, so far, with the H5N1 bird flu, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Source: "Study: Bird Flu Death Rate May Be Overblown," CNN.
  • 346 -- The number of people killed, so far, by the H5N1 bird flu, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Source: "Study: Bird Flu Death Rate May Be Overblown," CNN.
  • 15 -- The percentage of surgeons who responded to a survey published in the Archives of Surgery who had scores indicating an alcohol problem. According to the study, alcohol abuse rates among surgeons are higher than those of the rest of the population. Source: "One in Six Surgeons Has an Alcohol Problem, Study Finds," CBS.
  • 19 -- The percentage of 11th and 12th graders surveyed by Liberty Mutual Insurance and Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) who admitted to driving while high. Source: "'Disturbing' Study Finds 19 Percent of Teens Drive After Using Marijuana," CBS.
  • 13 -- The percentage of 11th and 12th graders surveyed by Liberty Mutual Insurance and Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) who admitted to driving after drinking. Source: "'Disturbing' Study Finds 19 Percent of Teens Drive After Using Marijuana," CBS.
  • 3 -- The number of years ago that the fake Avastin drug, which was just recently found in the United States, was seized in Syria. Source: "A.M. Vitals: Fake Avastin Turned Up in Syria in 2009," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 84 -- The current number of programs in the United States designed to provide care to the elderly at home, at adult day-care centers, and at specialists' offices rather than in traditional nursing homes, according to the New York Times. That's up from 42 programs just five years ago. Source: "A.M. Vitals: Fake Avastin Turned Up in Syria in 2009," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 20 -- The approximate percentage of piercings that become infected, according to Northwestern University dermatologists. Source: "The Lowdown on Body Piercing: Dermatologists Study, Offer Checklist," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 13 -- The number of deaths, in 10 states, that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has linked to a chemical used to strip bathtubs. Source: "CDC Warns of Bathtub Refinishing Chemical Tied to 13 Deaths," CBS.
  • 2 -- The percentage of us who are known as supertaskers by David Strayer, director of the applied cognition lab at the University of Utah. According to Strayer, these people show no ill effects from multitasking. Source: "This Is Your Brain on Multitasking," Psychology Today.
  • 12 -- The average age in the United States at which women are getting their first period. That age is younger than it has ever been. Source: "Why Are Girls Getting Their Periods So Young?" Psychology Today.
  • 70 -- The percentage of people who hold their cellphone to the ear on the same side of the body as their dominant hand, according to a recent survey of more than 700 people. Source: "Brain Calls the Shots on Which Hand Holds Cellphone," HealthDay News.
  • 20 -- The number of hours that 27-year-old Sevket Cavdar was in the operating room while doctors performed the world's first quadruple limb transplant. Cavdar lost both legs and arms at 13. Source: "Docs Perform First Quadruple Limb Transplant," Newser.
  • 12 -- The age of Alex Rodriguez, a Shelbyville, Tennessee, resident who recently stopped cancer treatment after five years of chemo, rehabilitation, and surgery. Source: "12-Year-Old Boy Stops Cancer Treatment," Newser.
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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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