Singles in America: The Findings of a Comprehensive Sex Survey

Match.com surveyed more than 5,000 single Americans for its second annual "Singles in America" study, the largest comprehensive study of singles in this country, according to survey adviser Helen Fisher. Here, some of the results:

Women are sex fiends! Ok, not fiends, per se, but 50 percent would dump a guy for being bad in bed. Meanwhile, men were turned off by low sex drive in a partner. It's the age-old battle of quantity vs. quality, some might say. Women also enjoy ambition, cleanliness, independence, and a sense of humor. Men, for the record, like ambition too, and we'd guess they also like their partners to be clean, though that was not reported. In other news, now that it's 2012, men mostly don't mind being stay at home dads, or, at least, think it's acceptable. Stereotypes be gone!

Gay men are more likely to believe in love at first sight than are straight men. fourteen percent of them say they have actually experienced the scientific phenomenon.

Men are woefully misunderstood. Just because that guy broke up with you after seven dates using the well-practiced method of never speaking to you again doesn't mean it didn't hurt him deeply -- nor that he's not still pining away after you. Among the learnings gleaned via this survey about menfolk: Men are more likely to fall in love at first sight; men believe couples can stay married forever; men like to show affection; men think sex is better with a long-term partner than a one-night stand (except maybe this guy); men are, by and large, adorable, loving individuals and why they ever got a bad rap is a mystery to us all, Gary.

Old people are picky, but also highly orgasmic. And ... we're done here. The first rule of sex surveys is to know when to stop talking about sex surveys. 

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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