Meat: What Big Agriculture and the Ethical Butcher Have in Common

The power that industrial animal agriculture has allows it to manipulate the rhetoric of alternative animal-based systems to its advantage.

PigFarm-Post.jpg

I've repeatedly argued that supporting alternatives to the industrial production of animal products serves the ultimate interest of industrial producers. The decision to eat animal products sourced from small, local, and sustainable farms might seem like a fundamental rejection of big business as usual. It is, however, an implicit but powerful confirmation of the single most critical behavior necessary to the perpetuation of factory farming: eating animals. So long as consumers continue to eat meat, eggs, and dairy -- even if they are sourced from small farms practicing the highest welfare and safety standards -- they're providing, however implicitly, an endorsement of the products that big agriculture will always be able to produce more efficiently and cheaply. And thus dominate.

Contrary to how it sounds, HumaneWatch is the self-appointed watchdog -- think Cujo -- of a group that actually does watch out for dogs, and many other animals,

Until the act of eating animals itself is made problematic, "voting with our forks" will be little more than a vacuous slogan. Critics claim that it's unrealistic to expect a substantial transition to veganism, and advocate the support of small-scale animal farms as a more achievable alternative. What's truly unrealistic, however, is the expectation that small, more eco-friendly and "humane" farms will permanently defy economic logic and convince a meaningful percentage of meat and dairy eaters to spend substantially more money to buy a nobler egg or pork chop. I'd bet on a massive transition to veganism before a massive transition to economic irrationality.

A point that's germane to this issue, but frequently muted, is how the preexisting power and amorality of industrial animal agriculture enables it to manipulate the rhetoric of alternative animal-based systems to its profitable advantage. Agribusiness has been conspicuously nonplussed by the rise of the food movement, shrugging its shoulders as it markets itself as "sustainable," "supporting family farms," and steadfastly oriented toward the "welfare" of animals. Industry grasps, then thrills in manipulating, the axiom that language is both cheap and powerful. Industrial machinations are helped along by the fact that the food movement's buzzwords are slackened catchphrases that allow the largest pig farm on the planet to advertise itself as "humane" and "sustainable." This fungible verbal lexicon, with every well-meaning new term appropriated by the marketers at Big Ag, is the food movement's Achilles' heel.

A recent confirmation of this point is the emergence of an organization called humanewatch.org. Contrary to how it sounds, HumaneWatch is the self-appointed watchdog -- think Cujo -- of a group that actually does watch out for dogs, and many other animals, with admirable dedication: the Humane Society of the United States. Calling HSUS a "stealth animal rights organization" that's stealing money from the public to promote secret agendas, humanewatch.com is a propaganda tool of the Center for Consumer Freedom. According to Source Watch, CCF is "a front group for the restaurant, alcohol, tobacco, and other industries" that "run media campaigns which oppose the efforts of scientists, health advocates, doctors, animal advocates, [and] environmentalists." Its website offers a sordid example of how the pursuit of sustainable animal agriculture, so long as the consumption of animal products is encouraged, easily plays into the hands of influential industrial interests.

Presented by

James McWilliams is an associate professor of history at Texas State University, San Marcos, and author of Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly.

The Blacksmith: A Short Film About Art Forged From Metal

"I'm exploiting the maximum of what you can ask a piece of metal to do."

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Riding Unicycles in a Cave

"If you fall down and break your leg, there's no way out."

Video

Carrot: A Pitch-Perfect Satire of Tech

"It's not just a vegetable. It's what a vegetable should be."

Video

An Ingenious 360-Degree Time-Lapse

Watch the world become a cartoonishly small playground

Video

The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain

"You really have to love solitary time by yourself."

Video

The Rise of the Cat Tattoo

How a Brooklyn tattoo artist popularized the "cattoo"

More in Health

From This Author

Just In