Ex-Komen Official Mollie Williams Has No Plans to Return to Group

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The ex-Komen foundation official Mollie Williams, who oversaw the group's grant program until she resigned to protest Komen's decision to blackball Planned Parenthood (as first reported in this space), just e-mailed me a statement in which she -- very graciously, as you will see -- praises her ex-employer for reversing its stance on Planned Parenthood funding:

I am pleased that Susan G. Komen for the Cure apologized for its actions and seemingly reversed course. Planned Parenthood and Komen have complementary missions. They can accomplish much more together than divided.  It was an honor to lead Komen's community health programs, and I wish them the best of luck as they move beyond this crisis.

I e-mailed Williams back, asking her if she would consider returning to Komen now that it has fixed the problem that caused her to resign. She wrote in response: "While their mission remains very important to me, I have no plans to return to Komen. It was an honor to lead Komen's community health efforts over the past six years, but I am ready for a new challenge. I will be forever grateful to Komen for giving me the opportunity to make a meaningful difference in the lives of women." She also said she's been contacted about possible job opportunities by several organizations (though she is still without work); that several hundred people have gotten in touch with her to offer her encouragement; and that it's even been suggested to her that she run for Congress.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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