Do We Need Better Medical-Ethics Training?

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Or maybe typing classes.  Astonishing finding reported by Reuters:


[T]wResidents are doctors who have finished medical school, and are continuing their required clinical training in a particular field.

Among the 937 applicants, 357 put down that they had at least one research study that was published or about to be published in a peer-reviewed outlet.

When Amies Oelschlager's group went to find those publications, 156 of the 1,000 publications listed turned up missing.

They looked online, in publication databases and even contacted the journal for verification.

Of the other publications that were confirmed, the researchers found inaccuracies there as well.

The biggest error was that 62 applicants had listed a publication as "peer-reviewed" when it wasn't.

The higher the stakes, the greater the incentives to cheat.  Still, these sorts of errors are many multiples of the percentage I would have expected, even with the most generous interpretation of how the mistakes were made.

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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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