Vital Signs: Bird Flu; Obesity Rates; Sudden Deaths Blamed on Sex

More

The latest facts and figures from the all of the most influential medical journals; newspapers; and health, fitness, and wellness websites.

  • 20 -- The number of seconds you should wash your hands with soap and water when trying to remove germs. Source: "What the Yuck: Is the Hand-Sanitizer Pump Dirty?" CNN.
  • 97 -- The percentage of people queried in a study recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine who thought that the ability to have "open visit chart notes" was a positive thing. Source: "When Patients See Their Medical Record," KevinMD.
  • 500,000,000 -- The amount of money, in dollars, brought in every year by diabetes drug Victoza in the United States. Controlled by Denmark's Novo Nordisk, Victoza was in the news recently for bringing on Food Network Paula Deen as a spokeswoman. Source: "From the Queen of Butter to the Queen of Diabetes," Nature Medicine.
  • 318 -- The increased risk, in percent, that children ages 4 and 5 have of becoming obese four years later if they have an overweight father and a healthy-weight mother. "Kids May Have Higher Obesity Risk if Dad Is Overweight, Study Says," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 1,388 -- The increased risk, in percent, that children ages 4 and 5 have of becoming obese four years later if they have an obese father and a healthy-weight mother. "Kids May Have Higher Obesity Risk if Dad Is Overweight, Study Says," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 3.5 -- The length, in inches, of a nail that a 32-year-old man in Orland Park, Illinois, accidentally shot into his skull while working on a project in his garage. Source: "Man Accidentally Shoots 3.5 Inch Nail Into Brain, Plows Snow After," CBS.
  • 1 -- The number of days it took a 32-year-old man who accidentally shot a 3.5-inch nail into his skull to notice that it was there. He didn't realize the problem until he woke from a nap feeling nauseous. Source: "Man Accidentally Shoots 3.5 Inch Nail Into Brain, Plows Snow After," CBS.
  • 60 -- The number of days that the authors of a pair of controversial studies on H5N1 bird flu will halt their research to allow an international scientific discussion to take place. Source: "Avian Flu Scientists Will 'Pause' Controversial Research for 60 Days," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 44,000,000 -- The number of Americans currently suffering from thinning bones. Source: "Older Women May Need Fewer Bone Tests," Harvard Health Blog.
  • 148 -- The number of calories burned during an hour of watching television by those who stand and step in place during commercials. Source: "Walking in Place During Commercials Offers a Good Calorie Burn," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 2,111 -- The number of steps taken during an hour of watching television by those who stand and step in place during commercials. Source: "Walking in Place During Commercials Offers a Good Calorie Burn," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 304 -- The number of calories burned during an hour of watching television while walking at three mph on a treadmill. Source: "Walking in Place During Commercials Offers a Good Calorie Burn," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 1.7 -- The maximum percentage of sudden deaths that may be related to sexual activity, according to autopsy studies. The minimum percentage is estimated at 0.6. Source: "Sex Is Safe for Most Heart Patients: AHA," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 1 -- The percentage of acute heart attacks for which sexual activity may be the cause. Source: "Sex Is Safe for Most Heart Patients: AHA," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 158,000,000 -- The amount, in dollars, that Johnson & Johnson will pay to settle claims by the state of Texas that overcharges to the state's Medicaid program were the result of the company promoting an antipsychotic drug for unapproved uses. Source: "A.M. Vitals: J&J to Settle Texas Risperdal Suit for $158 Million," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 20 -- The percentage of adults in the United States that suffer from a form of mental illness every year, according to new government statistics. Drug and alcohol problems were not considered a form of mental illness in the survey. Source: "A.M. Vitals: J&J to Settle Texas Risperdal Suit for $158 Million," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 60 -- The percentage of adults in the United States with a serious mental disorder that receive treatment, according to new government statistics. Source: "A.M. Vitals: J&J to Settle Texas Risperdal Suit for $158 Million," the Wall Street Journal.
  • 20 -- The percentage of pregnancies around the world in 2008 that were terminated with an abortion, according to a new report from the Guttmacher Institute and the World Health Organization. Source: "Abortion Ends One in Five Pregnancies Worldwide, Study Finds," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 43,800,000 -- The number of abortions performed around the world in 2008, which is up from 41,600,000 in 2003, according to a new report from the Guttmacher Institute and the World Health Organization. Source: "Abortion Ends One in Five Pregnancies Worldwide, Study Finds," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 49 -- The percentage of the 43,800,000 abortions performed around the world in 2008 that were unsafe, according to a new report from the Guttmacher Institute and the World Health Organization. Ninety-seven percent of abortions in Africa, the most perilous region considered in the report, were unsafe. Source: "Abortion Ends One in Five Pregnancies Worldwide, Study Finds," the Los Angeles Times.
  • 24 -- The percentage of pregnant teens or teenage mothers who said their partners didn't want to use birth control, according to new statistics from the Centers for Disease Control. Source: "Why Didn't Teen Moms Use Birth Control?" the Wall Street Journal.
  • 12 -- The number of teenage girls from LeRoy Junior-Senior High School outside of Buffalo, New York, who started experiencing symptoms similar to those of Tourette's syndrome -- painful shaking, jerking of the neck -- at the same time. Source: "Mass Hysteria Outbreak Reported in N.Y. Town: What Does It Mean?" CBS.
  • 5,400,000 -- The estimated number of Americans who are living with Alzheimer's disease. Source: "National Plan Aims to Bolster Fight Against Alzheimer's," Harvard Health Blog.
  • 16,000,000 -- The estimated number of Americans who will be living with Alzheimer's disease in 2050, the year that the epidemic is expected to crest. Source: "National Plan Aims to Bolster Fight Against Alzheimer's," Harvard Health Blog.
Jump to comments
Presented by

Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What Is the Greatest Story Ever Told?

A panel of storytellers share their favorite tales, from the Bible to Charlotte's Web.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Death of Film

You'll never hear the whirring sound of a projector again.

Video

How to Hunt With Poison Darts

A Borneo hunter explains one of his tribe's oldest customs: the art of the blowpipe

Video

A Delightful, Pixar-Inspired Cartoon

An action figure and his reluctant sidekick trek across a kitchen in search of treasure.

Video

I Am an Undocumented Immigrant

"I look like a typical young American."

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Writers

Up
Down

More in Health

Just In