Today in Research: The Best Kind of Doctors; Spotting Weight Gain

Discovered: the color of the Milky Way, a far away galaxy, weight gain denial, the best kind of doctors.

  • Women have a hard time recognizing weight gain. Considering our obsession with image and diet and exercise and obesity and anorexia, this latest finding comes as a surprise to us. Out of a sample of 466 women, nearly one third of the participants did not notice a weight gain of between 4.5 and 8.8 pounds. And some didn't notice additional weight of up to 11 pounds. These women apparently don't have passive aggressive mothers, who notice that kind of thing for them. [Eureka]
  • The best kind of doctors. Some of us pick our doctors based on marriage potential, but for the rest of you, research has found that surgeons provide the safest care between ages 35 and 50. That almost matches up with physician's "peak performance" age, which happens between ages 30 and 50. Either way, nab a 35-year-old hunky doctor and he should fix you up real good. [BMJ]

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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