Today in Research: Milk's Health Benefits; Better Male Contraception

Research: A promising male contraception technique, what started the Little Ice Age, milk does it again, the importance of kindergarten.

  • A promising male contraception technique. They call it "sonicating sperm," which if it borrows any techniques form those electric toothbrushes, sounds like it could be a bit painful. But, we're all for the equitable distribution of birth control, so we hope this works out. Experimenting with ultrasound, researchers at the University of North Carolina found the equipment reduced sperm counts in rats to levels that would make humans infertile. At first this sounds dandy, but then again, how permanent is it? Science doesn't know yet. "However, further studies are required to determine how long the contraceptive effect lasts and if it is safe to use multiple times," explained James Tsuruta. We're guessing most dudes won't want to take the chance. [Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology]
  • We get it, milk is good for us. Adding to the pile of literature (and ads) promoting milk's health benefits, the drink also apparently makes us brainier. Out of more than 900 participants in a recent study, regular milk drinkers were five times less likely to fail a series of brain tests, even when controlling for other factors. The fact that the study was funded by the "nation's milk processors," discounts the findings a tad. We're not take any chances, though. Tomorrow begins the all-milk diet. [International Dairy Journal]

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