Today in Research: Marriage Isn't Much Better Than Cohabitation

Discovered: 19,232 new species, the Choking Game trend, marriage isn't all that healthy after-all, a miracle tree, mental-illness abounds, challenging the women-are-bad-at-math research.

  • The disturbing Choking Game trend. This sounds more dangerous than all that cocaine smart kids are doing. Nearly one out of seven college students surveyed had participated in the Choking Game, aka the Fainting Game, aka Pass Out, aka Space Monkey. As those names indicate, this isn't even an inane college drinking activity, but rather a game (game?!) where participants cut off blood flow to each others brains in order to get high. Why not just smoke a joint or blow some coke and call it a day? The study looked at 837 students at Texas University, 16 percent of whom admitted playing, so maybe this is just a Texas thing. [The Crime Victims' Institute]
  • Marriage has few well-being benefits over cohabitation. This one's going to hurt that pro-family values cadre. Turns out marriage has fewer benefits than some would like. "While married couples experienced health gains -- likely linked to the formal benefits of marriage such as shared health care plans," starts off researcher Kelly Musick, with seemingly good advice for marriage advocates. "Cohabiting couples experienced greater gains in happiness and self-esteem. For some, cohabitation may come with fewer unwanted obligations than marriage and allow for more flexibility, autonomy, and personal growth," she continues, bringing the marriage myth down with her. This should satisfy The Atlantic's resident single lady, Kate Bolick. [Journal of Marriage and Family]
  • A miracle tree that purifies water. Anything with the name "miracle" in it makes us skeptical, but science thinks the seeds of the Moringa oleifera could be used to purify drinking water. And it's cheap! And it's safe! And it's sustainable! And ... it sounds a bit too good to be true. But when sand was added to the seeds they killed dirty microbes. "The results open the possibility that ... f-sand can provide a simple, locally sustainable process for producing storable drinking water," said optimistic researchers. [Langmuir]

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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