Today in Research: Heart Attacks Down; Depressed by Overtime

Discovered: An even better invisibility cloak, the crime genes, working hard is depressing, the speed limit of particles, and heart attack deaths halved over the last 10 years.

  • Deaths from heart attacks halved in a decade. In England! Almost sounded like good news for our obesity epidemic here. But no, this celebratory bit goes to our British brethren. Looking at 840,175 men and women, University of Oxford researchers found that deaths from heart attacks were down 50 percent in men and 53 percent in women. Congrats, Brits. We'll be wallowing at McDonald's. [University of Oxford]
  • Working hard is depressing. Bosses: those demanding 11 hour days are inciting depression. Not like, "Oh, man, working isn't very fun, we wish we could not do it so much" type of depression, but more like the clinical type. Workers who blogged, er, we mean, did whatever activity other jobs entail for 11 hours or more per day were twice as likely to have a "major depressive episode," according to research out of University College London. "Although occasionally working overtime may have benefits for the individual and society, it is important to recognize that working excessive hours is also associated with an increased risk of major depression," said Marianna Virtanen. OK, we're going to go home now. [University College London]

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