Today in Research: Banning Ads for Fast Food Really Does Work

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Discovered: The 11th warmest year on record, comet death on camera, banning fast food ads works, red wine's back, and where you vote matters.

  • Banning fast food ads works. As McDonald's advertisements make the food look delicious and nutritious, this doesn't quite surprise us. But, here's some academic proof: Following the commercial ban in Quebec, researchers found fast-food expenditures reduced 13 percent per week in French-speaking households. That added up to between 11 million and 22 million fewer fast-food meals eaten per year, or 2.2 billion to 4.4 billion fewer calories consumed by children. [Journal of Marketing Research]
  • More good news for wine drinkers, sort of. After that red-wine research fraud blow the other day, here's a tiny bit of good news for the grape-based beverage. The antioxidants in grapes, those same antioxidants everyone's always raving about, could prevent age-related blindness. It's not exactly the fountain of youth miracle drink we had once thought, but it's a step. [Free Radical Biology and Medicine]

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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