The Paula Deen Dishes That Paula Deen Shouldn't Eat Anymore

Whether or not Paula Deen announces she has Type 2 diabetes on Tuesday, we've found that it's probably a good idea for her to stay away from some of her own dishes. Obviously her calorie-defiant, butter-slathered food dishes have become punchlines for news outlets since the diabetes news broke -- and even before the rumors of Deen's possible metabolic disease became a reality, her food was already the muse of many an Internet meme and an object of Anthony Bourdain's seething, frothy hate. Based on her treasure trove of recipes and research from the American Diabetes Association, Livestrong, and WebMD, we've gone ahead and highlighted some of Deen's diabetes danger foods (foods high in carbs, starches, sugars that wreak havoc on your body's glucose levels and "bad" fats that up the risk of heart disease -- a reality for some people living with diabetes) that she should probably avoid ... or at least have in moderation (if there's such a thing as moderation when it comes to a milkshake souped up with eight tablespoons of sugar or a chicken finger-mozzarella stick-french fry sandwich).

THE SANDWICH

What Paula Calls It: The Fat Darrell Sandwich
What It Is: A sandwich featuring layers of chicken fingers (three per serving), french fries, mozzarella sticks, and marinara sauce.
Why It's Bad: The recipe calls for lard and oil for frying the chicken fingers, mozzarella sticks (16 oz. of cheese here), and french fries -- the kind of fats the American Diabetes Association frowns upon because of heart disease risk. But there's also a ton of starches and carbohydrates here thanks to the loaves of bread, breaded chicken fingers, and french fries. (Yes, we do know this is a riff of the Rutgers University version.)
Cross This Off Too: The Deep-Fried Bagel Sandwich

THE BREAKFAST

What Paula Calls It: The Lady's Brunch Burger
What It Is: It's a cheeseburger ... kind of.  A cheeseburger topped with bacon, eggs, and crammed between two glazed doughnuts. 
Why It's Bad: The carb/sugar combination of the doughnuts. As the ADA points out, carbohydrates raise blood glucose and so does the amount of sugar in a glazed doughnut.
Cross This Off Too: Oven-baked Dutch Apple Pancakes (the processed apple filling)

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