The 65-Year-Old New Hampshire Farmer Trying to Save Maple Syrup

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Meet Martha Carlson. This maple syrup climate crusader has spent the last three decades farming sugar maples on a 60-acre plot in New Hampshire. In recent years, she has seen some strange things. The trees are changing: They're stressed, she says, and aren't producing like they once were. By 2100, the entire $3 million maple syrup industry in the United States could be wiped out due to climate change. Carlson will be gone by then, but she cares about the trees and is currently working to preserve them as best she can. Losing a tree, she says, is like "losing an old friend, or like somebody murdered my own family, because this isn't just dying my accident. If they're being killed by our acid deposition or our climate change, then we need to feel differently about that."

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The Climate Desk is a journalistic collaboration between The Atlantic, Mother Jones, Slate, and others, dedicated to exploring the impact—human, environmental, economic, political—of a changing climate. Learn more at theclimatedesk.org.

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