Drew Berry's Beautiful Animations of Our Biological Processes

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Throughout the history of biological sciences, researchers have attempted to visualize the micro-world of our human bodies through various forms of art. Art simply makes all the fancy technical jargon-filled talks more understandable and interesting (and helps a college student taking Molecular Biology pass the course).

Using the latest in 3-D and 4-D computer animation, biomedical animator Drew Berry shows off in this recently posted TED Talk some stunning animations of various processes that go on around the clock in our cells.

Take a look at the TED Talk below showing beautiful and accurate animations of DNA replication and mitosis in action. It's like a Pixar movie about the life of cells.

If you like what you see, be sure to check out more of Drew Berry's work at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research website.


This post also appears on medGadget, an Atlantic partner site.

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