Today in Research: Apple Juice's Very Bad Week; Global Warming

More

Discovered: citizen scientists, when gossip is good, ominous global warming stats to skip over, and some more terrible things about apple juice.

  • Apple juice is having a very bad few weeks. So, yes, last week -- to the surprise of many -- Dr. Oz's war against arsenic in apple juice found some vindication from Consumer Reports who convinced the FDA that there was some merit to checking up about those purported arsenic levels. But, for those who would really alter their apple juice consumption habits over the feud, today, the Associated Press published its own unfavorable profile of the drink. And it couldn't be more dismissive, seemingly connecting apple juice to everything unhealthy in just two sentences: "Apple juice has few natural nutrients, lots of calories and, in some cases, more sugar than soda has. It trains a child to like very sweet things, displaces better beverages and foods, and adds to the obesity problem, its critics say." [Associated Press]
  • The global warming statistics that will be ignored today. In a post-Inconvenient Truth era, the bar is set pretty high for a climate change study, stat, or theory to break through to an American public that's seen far too many ominous global warming stats. So, here's two: 74 percent of the "warming" in "global warming" was found to be man made, according to Swiss researchers who used a new statistical model to come to a "strikingly similar" results in line with previous studies, the journal Nature reports. Conveniently, this study arrives just as the Global Carbon Project released it's latest assessment of global fossil fuel burning: "Carbon Emissions Show Biggest Jump Ever Recorded." Briefly unsettling enough? No? Here's how Earth could look in 2080. [NatureThe New York Times]

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

Jump to comments
Presented by

The Atlantic Wire is your authoritative guide to the news and ideas that matter most right now.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Sad Desk Lunch: Is This How You Want to Die?

How to avoid working through lunch, and diseases related to social isolation.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

Up
Down

More in Health

Just In