Sweatworking: One More Reason to Make Regular Visits to the Gym

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The Sunday's New York Times's experts at observing trendy trends have uncovered an exhausting development for the working world: "sweatworking," they call it. A piece this week by Courtney Rubin outlines the burgeoning practice of taking a client to the gym to network and simultaneously sweat -- hence "sweatwork" -- and seems generally to favor the practice as a great alternative to traditional, less healthy networking techniques like heavy drinking or eating at restaurants. There are some downsides to this practice we learn (very far down in the article.) One person profiled admits she "had a client who once ran out of class and vomited, explaining that she hadn't exercised in a year." So you might be understandably apprehensive about pitching a sweatworking event to an out-of-shape business colleague, who might be equally apprehensive about projectile vomiting in your business meeting. But health is just the most obvious benefit to sweatworking. There are plenty of others, so we've culled the article for a handy guide on the top ways to pitch your workout meeting to an exercise-averse client:

Release your primal aggression: "Erika Wadler, a 35-year-old reality television developer in New York ... now pummels her clients with her own hands, at Mendez boxing gym in the Flatiron district." Here's a method best used for clients who harbor a secret, burning hatred for you. Invite them to a boxing gym and drop subtle hints that you might even allow them a few good left jabs at your face. It's best not to highlight the other side of that, which is that by breaking down your client's will to live, you can get him to submit to just about any of your demands/fees/job requests. After all, Wadler tells the Times: "When you're dripping sweat and the trainer's yelling, 'just five more situps,' it breaks a barrier." Picture it:

You: Easily knocking out some squats. I've been meaning to tell you, we're increasing our hourly rate by 10 percent. Hopefully not a problem for you guys.

Trainer: At your client If you don't give me 15 more pushups I'm going to break your face.

Client: Softly weeping 10 percent? Fine, fine!

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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